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The 6 enemies are lust, anger, avarice, blind attachment, vanity and jealousy.  These enemies (ripus) should not be suppressed, rather they should be expressed or regulated in a controlled way. That is, we should not allow them under any circumstances to go against a recognized code of social conduct.

If any of the ripus are suppressed, then that ripu will find expression through one of the other 5 ripus.

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That which is inherent or intrinsic in the mind and expresses itself in the external world is called Ripu or enemy. There are six Ripus lust, anger, avarice, blind attachment, vanity and jealousy. That which originates in the external world and influences the mind is called Pasha. Thus Ripu is intro-external and Pasha is extro-internal.

An intelligent or wise person should keep the Ripus under control and resist the Pashas. The ancient saints and sages did not prescribe any method for the resistance of the Ripus because the Ripus should be regulated. If a Ripu is resisted or suppressed, then the suppressed Ripus finds expression through another Ripu. Suppose in a person the instinct of greed is very strong. He is compelled to keep this instinct under control, under pressure of poverty. If a person who habitually takes bribes is found not taking bribes due to the enforcement department, then that suppressed instinct of greed will manifest itself through anger or any other Ripu. That is, he will burst into violent anger.

So, the psychological approach to the Ripus is to keep them under control and not allow them under any circumstances to go against a recognized code of social conduct.” – Shrii Shrii A’nandamurti, 23 March 1986, Calcutta, Eledit 6, 2001, Shabda Cayanika’ Part 4, Sin, Crime And Law

So it must be remembered that the Ripus have got to be controlled and the Pashas must be resisted.” – Shrii Shrii A’nandamurti, 23 March 1986, Calcutta, Eledit 6, 2001, Shabda Cayanika’ Part 4, Sin, Crime And Law
“The underlying weaknesses which cause immense harm to human beings are called ripus [enemies]. They are six in number: ka’ma [longing for physicality], krodha [anger], lobha [avarice], mada [vanity], moha [blind attachment], and ma’tsarya [jealousy].
” – Shrii Shrii A’nandamurti, 1984-1985, Calcutta, Eledit 6, 2001, Discourses On Tantra Volume 1, The Acoustic Roots Of The Indo-Aryan Alphabet

The beginning, the middle and end of dharma sádhaná is to rush towards Him, to channelize all the positive and negative propensities of mind toward Him. Spiritual aspirants will not destroy the six ripus (not even káma or physical longing) but will utilize them for their benefit. When utilized as aids for spiritual progress they will do no further harm. So-called jiṋánis may fight the propensity of krodha (anger), but devotees will utilize it to fight staticity. They will shatter the meanness and pettiness of the mind through psychic strength and fearsome temper. So-called jiṋánis claim that the propensity of greed (lobh) is harmful, but devotees disagree – they nurture greed to attain Him. Jiṋánis abhor vanity or pride (mada), but devotees say that the only object of pride in their lives is Parama Puruśa. Jiṋánis detest the propensity of blind attachment (moha), but devotees say, “I am already in love with Him. I have a blind attachment for attaining my Lord”. The propensity of jealousy (mátsarya) as a ripu is very bad, but a spiritual aspirant will never take it as harmful. In this way spiritual aspirants keep their vision fixed on Brahma. Those who fail to focus their entire entitative existence on Him, those who do not flow towards the Macrocosmic Nucleus of the Cosmic Cycle, realize one day that everything in their lives has become futile.” – Sri Sri Anandamurtii, Phálgunii Púrńimá 1958 DMC, Amrah, Birbhum, ElEdit 7, Ananda Marga Ideology and Way of Life in a Nutshell Part 8, The Macrocosmic Stance and Human Life, Abhinivesha

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